Colorful food has been making waves around the world of late, and 2018 will see no stop to that trend. But before Instagram came along, did you know that bright foods have been staples in many countries for years?

Red: Red Velvet Cake (USA)

First up in the rainbow, it’s red. And what could be more red than Red Velvet Cake? Honestly, the clue is in the name! Sure, it’s not really a naturally occurring shade, but the Cheesecake has been an American classic since the 1920’s, with its exact origins somewhat disputed. Was it pioneered by the Adams Extract Company? Or by the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York? Who knows – but what we do know, is that it’s delicious.

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Orange: Mango Salsa (Central & South America)

The tradition of making sauce from fruits dates back to pre-Columbian times. Mango salsa is simply a variation on fresh salsa (Spanish for “sauce”), that’s used across the region as well as generally in Spanish cooking.

Yellow: Polenta (Italy)

This staple of Northern Italian cuisine, Polenta, is a pale yellow in colour. And it’s delicious. On paper, it doesn’t sound too great – boiled cornmeal, yum – but you have to trust us here! You can have it served hard and firm, or creamy and soft, and it’s found everywhere in the country; whether you’re looking for cheap eats, or something a little fancier.

Green: Matcha Ice Cream (Japan)

Green ice cream? What sorcery is this? Who cares – it tastes amazing! Matcha actually originates in China, but it’s widely found across Japan and they use it in traditional tea ceremonies there. Of course, with Japan being famed for a culture that so easily blurs the contrast of modern and old, it’s now used to flavor ice cream, too.

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Blue: Butterfly Pea Powder Latte (Thailand)

Watching boring old tea transform into a beautiful blue is like watching a butterfly complete its transformation… so that’s how we like to think it got its name. In actual fact, the drink – which can be found across Thailand – is made by brewing tea made from the vibrant butterfly pea flower.

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Indigo & Violet: Purple Corn Pudding (Peru)

Move over “normal” corn. In Peru, you can actually get it of the purple variety! It’s hard to find elsewhere, but when you’re off on your travels, trying it in their signature pudding is a must. Mazamorra Morada uses purple corn, fruits, cinnamon and sugar to hit that sweet spot. Good news: it’s super good for you, too. The darker your food, the more antioxidants it contains. Who knew?

Rainbow: Skittles (UK)

Want to “taste the rainbow” – quite literally? British favorite sweeties come in all kinds of colors, literally every color of the rainbow! Fun fact: they’re completely devoid of color during

Rainbow: Mermaid Drinks (Mexico)

Heading to Mexico? Starbucks created a mermaid drink, exclusive to the country. The reason why it’s so unique? Its blend of green melon crème and topped with blue vanilla whipped cream, blue and pink sugar crystals and iridescent violet pearls, probably means it’s a tad on the naughty side to be available everywhere!

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Rainbow: Unicorn Drinks (Worldwide)

When Starbucks released their drinks swirling all the colors in the galaxy, it only made multi-colored drinks mainstream – but the reality is, you can find unicorn inspired drinks all around the world if you know where to look! Check this one out from California.

We’re seeing more and more wild and wonderful rainbow food cropping up in the most unnatural – but awesome – ways. From rainbow layer cake to rainbow grilled cheese sandwiches, to donuts and even mermaid croissants?! The world’s food scene is getting a whole lot more innovative. And more fun, too!

If that hasn’t satisfied your curious foodie self, check out where to find foods in a darker shade of black here >