from $194.65

Puno & Lake Titicaca

Tour Map

Tour style - Culture & History

3 days

Lake Titicaca is not only the largest lake in South America, it's also overflowing with culture and history. Sitting at 3838m above sea level, this is the highest navigable lake in the world. Take a day trip on the lake to meet its most famous residents—the Uros people, who live on floating, man-made islands made of reeds collected from the lake. In the evening, return to Puno and enjoy some live music in this town famous for its festivals and dances.
  • Day 1 Puno

    Arrive Puno and transfer to your hotel for overnight in Puno. Please note that hot water shortages and power outages can be fairly common in Peru (even in upgraded hotels and private homes). We appreciate your patience and understanding that these occurrences are outside of our control. Located at 3830m above sea level; as a result the weather can be extreme with very cold nights and a strong sun during the day. Puno is also known for its wealth of traditional dances: there are up to 100 different varieties, usually performed in the street processions celebrating Catholic feast days. If you are fortunate enough to be visiting at the right time you may even catch one of these celebrations. If you have free time, we suggest an optional visit to the chullpas (funerary towers) of Sillustani – fantastic ruins, located outside Puno.

  • Day 2 Puno (1B)

    This morning take a boat ride on Lake Titicaca to visit the floating reed islands of the Uros people. Visit various islands to enjoy scenic splendour and meet the friendly local villagers. Enjoy your afternoon at leisure in Puno. Titicaca is also the largest lake in the world above 2000m, and the views from the islands are stunning. The most famous sites on the lake are the unique floating islands of the Uros people, made of Totora reeds. The Uros began their unusual floating existence centuries ago in an effort to isolate themselves from the Colla and Inca tribes. Sadly, the Uros language has died out, and today the islanders speak Aymara due to intermarriage with Aymara-speaking clans. Today about 300 families live on the islands, however their numbers are slowly declining. The Totora reeds that grow in the shallows of the lake are used for making everything from the islands themselves to the model boats that the islanders sell. The islands are made up of layers upon layers of reeds; as the layers closest to the water start to rot, they are replaced with fresh reeds on top. The reeds are also used to build their boats, which if constructed well will last up to 6 months.

  • Day 3 Puno (1B)

    Transfer to the airport for your onward travel.

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